For details of previous meetings, click here.

Saturday 7th December 2019

Conducted by Neil Hawes

Please note that music files that are linked to are not necessarily the same edition we will be using on the day and therefore there may be some slight differences.

The Oxford Book of English Madrigals is not needed this month.

Anon Rejoice in the Lord alway or YouTube SATB
This beautiful 16th century anthem was for many years attributed to John Redford, who died in 1547, but it has been realised in recent years that there is no evidence for this, so it is now listed as anonymous. The words are from Philippians chapter 4, verses 4 to 7, which is part of a reading for the fourth Sunday in Advent.

Weelkes Lo country sports or YouTube SATB
Thomas Weelkes (1576-1623) was born in Sussex and became organist at Winchester College in 1598 and then moved to Chichester Cathedral in 1602. It was here later that he gained a reputation for being an alcoholic and for bad behaviour. In 1616 he was reported to the Bishop for being ‘noted and famed for a comon drunckard and notorious swearer & blasphemer’, and he was dismissed, but apparently retained most of his responsibilities. This piece was published in 1597 to words that would seem to be about Morris Dancing, although the bells you will hear sound more like church bells.

Wilbye Alas, what hope of speeding or YouTube SATB
John Wilbye (1574-1638) was born at Brome in Suffolk, the son of a tanner, and received the patronage of the Cornwallis family. This piece was published in 1598. The old meaning of speeding before motorised transport was “to succeed, prosper, grow rich, or advance”.

Wilbye Thus saith my Cloris bright SATB
Wilbye published this piece in 1598 while under the patronage of the Cornwallis family with whom he lived at Hengrave Hall, near Bury St. Edmunds. Hengrave Hall still exists and is currently used for weddings and conferences. Although of lowly birth, he died a "gentleman" with a considerable estate - he left £400 in his will, a large sum at the time. The words are a loose and rather strange translation of an Italian poem, it almost seems like the person doing the translating didn’t understand some of the Italian. The "o" in "Cloris" should be as in "clock". The word "bugs" is an old Celtic word meaning ghost or goblin.

Dowland Weep you no more, sad fountains SATB
This and the following piece are by the lutenist John Dowland (1563-1626) who was very famous by the time this piece was published in 1603. He studied in Italy and worked in courtly or royal positions in London, Paris and Copenhagen, mostly writing dance music for the lute. Lute music often had a solo voice, and sometimes had alternate versions written for voices as well, or where voices could be substituted for the instruments. This particular piece is more madrigal style than lute.

Dowland Can she excuse my wrongs or YouTube SATB
Also see modern version - no harmonies, but the style is interesting!
This earlier piece by Dowland, published in 1597, is a lute piece arranged for voices. In its instrumental form, it was called “The Earl of Essex Galliard”, so it was intended to be able to be danced to. A Galliard was a very popular vigorous dance. Queen Elizabeth I was in her mid-fifties when a Privy Chamber report said, "the Queen is so well as I assure you, six or seven galliards in a morning, besides music and singing, is her ordinary exercise."

For details of previous meetings, click here.

Saturday 7th December 2019

Conducted by Neil Hawes

Please note that music files that are linked to are not necessarily the same edition we will be using on the day and therefore there may be some slight differences.

The Oxford Book of English Madrigals is not needed this month.

Anon Rejoice in the Lord alway or YouTube SATB
This beautiful 16th century anthem was for many years attributed to John Redford, who died in 1547, but it has been realised in recent years that there is no evidence for this, so it is now listed as anonymous. The words are from Philippians chapter 4, verses 4 to 7, which is part of a reading for the fourth Sunday in Advent.

Weelkes Lo country sports or YouTube SATB
Thomas Weelkes (1576-1623) was born in Sussex and became organist at Winchester College in 1598 and then moved to Chichester Cathedral in 1602. It was here later that he gained a reputation for being an alcoholic and for bad behaviour. In 1616 he was reported to the Bishop for being ‘noted and famed for a comon drunckard and notorious swearer & blasphemer’, and he was dismissed, but apparently retained most of his responsibilities. This piece was published in 1597 to words that would seem to be about Morris Dancing, although the bells you will hear sound more like church bells.

Wilbye Alas, what hope of speeding or YouTube SATB
John Wilbye (1574-1638) was born at Brome in Suffolk, the son of a tanner, and received the patronage of the Cornwallis family. This piece was published in 1598. The old meaning of speeding before motorised transport was “to succeed, prosper, grow rich, or advance”.

Wilbye Thus saith my Cloris bright SATB
Wilbye published this piece in 1598 while under the patronage of the Cornwallis family with whom he lived at Hengrave Hall, near Bury St. Edmunds. Hengrave Hall still exists and is currently used for weddings and conferences. Although of lowly birth, he died a "gentleman" with a considerable estate - he left £400 in his will, a large sum at the time. The words are a loose and rather strange translation of an Italian poem, it almost seems like the person doing the translating didn’t understand some of the Italian. The "o" in "Cloris" should be as in "clock". The word "bugs" is an old Celtic word meaning ghost or goblin.

Dowland Weep you no more, sad fountains SATB
This and the following piece are by the lutenist John Dowland (1563-1626) who was very famous by the time this piece was published in 1603. He studied in Italy and worked in courtly or royal positions in London, Paris and Copenhagen, mostly writing dance music for the lute. Lute music often had a solo voice, and sometimes had alternate versions written for voices as well, or where voices could be substituted for the instruments. This particular piece is more madrigal style than lute.

Dowland Can she excuse my wrongs or YouTube SATB
Also see modern version - no harmonies, but the style is interesting!
This earlier piece by Dowland, published in 1597, is a lute piece arranged for voices. In its instrumental form, it was called “The Earl of Essex Galliard”, so it was intended to be able to be danced to. A Galliard was a very popular vigorous dance. Queen Elizabeth I was in her mid-fifties when a Privy Chamber report said, "the Queen is so well as I assure you, six or seven galliards in a morning, besides music and singing, is her ordinary exercise."

For details of previous meetings, click here.

Saturday 7th December 2019

Conducted by Neil Hawes

Please note that music files that are linked to are not necessarily the same edition we will be using on the day and therefore there may be some slight differences.

The Oxford Book of English Madrigals is not needed this month.

Anon Rejoice in the Lord alway or YouTube SATB
This beautiful 16th century anthem was for many years attributed to John Redford, who died in 1547, but it has been realised in recent years that there is no evidence for this, so it is now listed as anonymous. The words are from Philippians chapter 4, verses 4 to 7, which is part of a reading for the fourth Sunday in Advent.

Weelkes Lo country sports or YouTube SATB
Thomas Weelkes (1576-1623) was born in Sussex and became organist at Winchester College in 1598 and then moved to Chichester Cathedral in 1602. It was here later that he gained a reputation for being an alcoholic and for bad behaviour. In 1616 he was reported to the Bishop for being ‘noted and famed for a comon drunckard and notorious swearer & blasphemer’, and he was dismissed, but apparently retained most of his responsibilities. This piece was published in 1597 to words that would seem to be about Morris Dancing, although the bells you will hear sound more like church bells.

Wilbye Alas, what hope of speeding or YouTube SATB
John Wilbye (1574-1638) was born at Brome in Suffolk, the son of a tanner, and received the patronage of the Cornwallis family. This piece was published in 1598. The old meaning of speeding before motorised transport was “to succeed, prosper, grow rich, or advance”.

Wilbye Thus saith my Cloris bright SATB
Wilbye published this piece in 1598 while under the patronage of the Cornwallis family with whom he lived at Hengrave Hall, near Bury St. Edmunds. Hengrave Hall still exists and is currently used for weddings and conferences. Although of lowly birth, he died a "gentleman" with a considerable estate - he left £400 in his will, a large sum at the time. The words are a loose and rather strange translation of an Italian poem, it almost seems like the person doing the translating didn’t understand some of the Italian. The "o" in "Cloris" should be as in "clock". The word "bugs" is an old Celtic word meaning ghost or goblin.

Dowland Weep you no more, sad fountains SATB
This and the following piece are by the lutenist John Dowland (1563-1626) who was very famous by the time this piece was published in 1603. He studied in Italy and worked in courtly or royal positions in London, Paris and Copenhagen, mostly writing dance music for the lute. Lute music often had a solo voice, and sometimes had alternate versions written for voices as well, or where voices could be substituted for the instruments. This particular piece is more madrigal style than lute.

Dowland Can she excuse my wrongs or YouTube SATB
Also see modern version - no harmonies, but the style is interesting!
This earlier piece by Dowland, published in 1597, is a lute piece arranged for voices. In its instrumental form, it was called “The Earl of Essex Galliard”, so it was intended to be able to be danced to. A Galliard was a very popular vigorous dance. Queen Elizabeth I was in her mid-fifties when a Privy Chamber report said, "the Queen is so well as I assure you, six or seven galliards in a morning, besides music and singing, is her ordinary exercise."