For details of previous meetings, click here.

Music for the Annual Dinner
Saturday 21st April 2018

Please note that music files that are linked to are not necessarily the same edition we will be using on the night and therefore there may be some slight differences.

Byrd Ave verum corpus or YouTube link SATB
William Byrd (1543-1623) was the greatest English composer of his era. His richly expressive Ave verum corpus was written for the feast of Corpus Christi: its clear structure, perfectly controlled polyphony and intense conviction reach directly to the listener and make it an enduring favourite.

Wilbye Adieu, sweet Amaryllis or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SATB
John Wilbye is one of the most famous English madrigalists and published over 60 such compositions. This rich and graceful piece was published in 1598. It starts plaintively in G minor and evokes the musical texture of a lute song. The ‘heavy tidings’ of the lovers’ parting become denser and more chromatic. After an apparent close on the major chord, Wilbye poignantly draws the music out further with a G major codetta, as if the speaker finds himself unable to utter the final ‘Adieu...’

Ford Since first I saw your face or YouTube link SATB
From Music of Sundry Kinds of 1607. As this was a collected publication the actual composer is unclear (but is unlikely to be Ford himself). Strictly a part-song rather than a madrigal – because it is not polyphonic – it is nevertheless a charming piece which has been well-received with us.

Greaves Come away sweet love or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATB
A lovely, graceful piece, one of the four madrigals published in Songs of sundrie kinds in 1604. The verses are homophonic, the fa-las polyphonic and there is some delightful word-painting on ‘and running in and out’!

Vautor Sweet Suffolk owl or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATB
This, from the composer’s one published book of madrigals, Songs of Divers Airs and Natures (1619), is Vautor's best-known piece. It’s a fun sing, with imitative ‘te whit te whoo’, some great word-painting on rolling quavers, and sudden changes of texture. Towards the end the duple meter is interrupted by a section in 3 time - ‘and sings a dirge for dying souls’ - a possible quote from William Byrd's keyboard piece The Bells. ‘Dight’ means 'dressed'.

Cavendish Come, gentle swains or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATB
This delicate and graceful piece of homage is from The Triumphs of Oriana

Wilbye Draw on, sweet night or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATTB
This gem of a piece is by Suffolk-born John Wilbye, one of the greatest of all English madrigalists. His style characterized by delicate voice-writing, acute sensitivity to text and the use of false relations between major and minor modes. It’s a great favourite of ours and has often been requested ever since its introduction to our repertory.

Morley Arise, awake or YouTube link SATTB
From The Triumphs of Oriana, Morley’s 1601 tribute to Queen Elizabeth - or, some would say, Anne of Denmark, who became queen of England alongside James I. This piece is a (seemingly hasty) re-working of the composer’s ‘Adieu ye kind and cruel’, possibly translated from an Italian canzonet. The ‘silly shepherds sleeping’ are awakened by the appearance of the Queen's entourage, so they sing her praises. There is a deft and rapid contrast of slow and quick music and, as ever, some clever word-painting, with the interval leaps on ‘arise’ and quick quavers on ‘awake, awake’ being great examples in the first three bars alone.

Lassus Mon coeur se recommande a vous or YouTube link SATB
A sad and beautiful love-letter – both a formal farewell and an appeal for one last meeting. Lassus, from modern-day Belgium, was one of the most famous and influential polyphonic masters of the late sixteenth century. He composed around 150 chansons, of which this is an example.

For details of previous meetings, click here.

Music for the Annual Dinner
Saturday 21st April 2018

Please note that music files that are linked to are not necessarily the same edition we will be using on the night and therefore there may be some slight differences.

Byrd Ave verum corpus or YouTube link SATB
William Byrd (1543-1623) was the greatest English composer of his era. His richly expressive Ave verum corpus was written for the feast of Corpus Christi: its clear structure, perfectly controlled polyphony and intense conviction reach directly to the listener and make it an enduring favourite.

Wilbye Adieu, sweet Amaryllis or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SATB
John Wilbye is one of the most famous English madrigalists and published over 60 such compositions. This rich and graceful piece was published in 1598. It starts plaintively in G minor and evokes the musical texture of a lute song. The ‘heavy tidings’ of the lovers’ parting become denser and more chromatic. After an apparent close on the major chord, Wilbye poignantly draws the music out further with a G major codetta, as if the speaker finds himself unable to utter the final ‘Adieu...’

Ford Since first I saw your face or YouTube link SATB
From Music of Sundry Kinds of 1607. As this was a collected publication the actual composer is unclear (but is unlikely to be Ford himself). Strictly a part-song rather than a madrigal – because it is not polyphonic – it is nevertheless a charming piece which has been well-received with us.

Greaves Come away sweet love or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATB
A lovely, graceful piece, one of the four madrigals published in Songs of sundrie kinds in 1604. The verses are homophonic, the fa-las polyphonic and there is some delightful word-painting on ‘and running in and out’!

Vautor Sweet Suffolk owl or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATB
This, from the composer’s one published book of madrigals, Songs of Divers Airs and Natures (1619), is Vautor's best-known piece. It’s a fun sing, with imitative ‘te whit te whoo’, some great word-painting on rolling quavers, and sudden changes of texture. Towards the end the duple meter is interrupted by a section in 3 time - ‘and sings a dirge for dying souls’ - a possible quote from William Byrd's keyboard piece The Bells. ‘Dight’ means 'dressed'.

Cavendish Come, gentle swains or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATB
This delicate and graceful piece of homage is from The Triumphs of Oriana

Wilbye Draw on, sweet night or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATTB
This gem of a piece is by Suffolk-born John Wilbye, one of the greatest of all English madrigalists. His style characterized by delicate voice-writing, acute sensitivity to text and the use of false relations between major and minor modes. It’s a great favourite of ours and has often been requested ever since its introduction to our repertory.

Morley Arise, awake or YouTube link SATTB
From The Triumphs of Oriana, Morley’s 1601 tribute to Queen Elizabeth - or, some would say, Anne of Denmark, who became queen of England alongside James I. This piece is a (seemingly hasty) re-working of the composer’s ‘Adieu ye kind and cruel’, possibly translated from an Italian canzonet. The ‘silly shepherds sleeping’ are awakened by the appearance of the Queen's entourage, so they sing her praises. There is a deft and rapid contrast of slow and quick music and, as ever, some clever word-painting, with the interval leaps on ‘arise’ and quick quavers on ‘awake, awake’ being great examples in the first three bars alone.

Lassus Mon coeur se recommande a vous or YouTube link SATB
A sad and beautiful love-letter – both a formal farewell and an appeal for one last meeting. Lassus, from modern-day Belgium, was one of the most famous and influential polyphonic masters of the late sixteenth century. He composed around 150 chansons, of which this is an example.

For details of previous meetings, click here.

Music for the Annual Dinner
Saturday 21st April 2018

Please note that music files that are linked to are not necessarily the same edition we will be using on the night and therefore there may be some slight differences.

Byrd Ave verum corpus or YouTube link SATB
William Byrd (1543-1623) was the greatest English composer of his era. His richly expressive Ave verum corpus was written for the feast of Corpus Christi: its clear structure, perfectly controlled polyphony and intense conviction reach directly to the listener and make it an enduring favourite.

Wilbye Adieu, sweet Amaryllis or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SATB
John Wilbye is one of the most famous English madrigalists and published over 60 such compositions. This rich and graceful piece was published in 1598. It starts plaintively in G minor and evokes the musical texture of a lute song. The ‘heavy tidings’ of the lovers’ parting become denser and more chromatic. After an apparent close on the major chord, Wilbye poignantly draws the music out further with a G major codetta, as if the speaker finds himself unable to utter the final ‘Adieu...’

Ford Since first I saw your face or YouTube link SATB
From Music of Sundry Kinds of 1607. As this was a collected publication the actual composer is unclear (but is unlikely to be Ford himself). Strictly a part-song rather than a madrigal – because it is not polyphonic – it is nevertheless a charming piece which has been well-received with us.

Greaves Come away sweet love or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATB
A lovely, graceful piece, one of the four madrigals published in Songs of sundrie kinds in 1604. The verses are homophonic, the fa-las polyphonic and there is some delightful word-painting on ‘and running in and out’!

Vautor Sweet Suffolk owl or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATB
This, from the composer’s one published book of madrigals, Songs of Divers Airs and Natures (1619), is Vautor's best-known piece. It’s a fun sing, with imitative ‘te whit te whoo’, some great word-painting on rolling quavers, and sudden changes of texture. Towards the end the duple meter is interrupted by a section in 3 time - ‘and sings a dirge for dying souls’ - a possible quote from William Byrd's keyboard piece The Bells. ‘Dight’ means 'dressed'.

Cavendish Come, gentle swains or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATB
This delicate and graceful piece of homage is from The Triumphs of Oriana

Wilbye Draw on, sweet night or YouTube link Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATTB
This gem of a piece is by Suffolk-born John Wilbye, one of the greatest of all English madrigalists. His style characterized by delicate voice-writing, acute sensitivity to text and the use of false relations between major and minor modes. It’s a great favourite of ours and has often been requested ever since its introduction to our repertory.

Morley Arise, awake or YouTube link SATTB
From The Triumphs of Oriana, Morley’s 1601 tribute to Queen Elizabeth - or, some would say, Anne of Denmark, who became queen of England alongside James I. This piece is a (seemingly hasty) re-working of the composer’s ‘Adieu ye kind and cruel’, possibly translated from an Italian canzonet. The ‘silly shepherds sleeping’ are awakened by the appearance of the Queen's entourage, so they sing her praises. There is a deft and rapid contrast of slow and quick music and, as ever, some clever word-painting, with the interval leaps on ‘arise’ and quick quavers on ‘awake, awake’ being great examples in the first three bars alone.

Lassus Mon coeur se recommande a vous or YouTube link SATB
A sad and beautiful love-letter – both a formal farewell and an appeal for one last meeting. Lassus, from modern-day Belgium, was one of the most famous and influential polyphonic masters of the late sixteenth century. He composed around 150 chansons, of which this is an example.