Go back to index of previous meetings.

Saturday 3rd October 2020 (virtual only)

YouTube playlist of all pieces

Tallis Salvator mundi or YouTube SAATB
Thomas Tallis became a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal in 1543 and remained there until his death. His career reflects the religious upheaval and political change that affected church music of this period. Salvator mundi, a setting of the antiphon for Matins on the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross (14 September), is the first of his two settings of the text. It begins imitatively, with soprano and alto 2 in canon at the octave, but quickly moves into a freer and more expressive style, with insistent pitch repetition at 'auxiliare nobis', an affecting pathos of the descending 'te deprecamur', and dissonant intervals creating a sense of magnificence and piquancy.

Weelkes As Vesta was or YouTube Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATTB
Thomas Weelkes was a colourful personality: as the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography puts it, 'he was not the only disorderly member of the cathedral establishment, though in due course he would become its most celebrated'. Organist at Chichester Cathedral, he was in 1616 reported to the Bishop for being 'noted and famed for a comon drunckard (sic) and notorious swearer & blasphemer', and was dismissed for being drunk at the organ and using bad language during divine service. He was soon reinstated (although his behaviour did not improve!) and remained in the post until his death. Weelkes' madrigals have often been compared to Wilbye's and he was friends with Morley.

Iíve chosen this piece because of its glorious word-painting! Look out for 'hill', 'descending', 'ascending', 'running down', 'two by two', 'three by three', 'all alone', and 'Long (live fair Oriana)'. The musical architecture is ABCDCBA, based on contrasts of texture.

Morley In every place or YouTube SATB
From Madrigals to 4 voyces (1594). A short but exquisite piece on the pains of love. Slow and delicate, note especially its plangent suspensions on 'and grief doth so torment me' and a sweetly evocative 'O gentle love'. We loved this piece when we first looked at it in March 2019 and I've been wanting to sing it again ever since!

Farmer Fair Phyllis or YouTube Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SATB
Fair Phyllis dates from 1599 and is a polyphonic romp in Arcadian meadows, with a fair amount of ribaldry thrown in for good measure. It alternates between duple and triple time and contains some clever word-painting: solo sopranos on 'all alone', tutti on 'feeding her flock' and some wry elision on 'kissing up and down'. 'Hied' is an archaic way of saying 'hurried'.

Morley Come lovers, follow me or YouTube SSAT
I've chosen this superb piece to take 'advantage' of the remote nature of this month's meeting, as it is a piece we wouldn't normally sing (as it is for SSAT). The subject is the sleeping Cupid.

Morley My bonny lass she smileth or YouTube SATTB
and Gastoldi Questa dolce sirena or YouTube also this instrumental version is lovely! SSATB
Morley's madrigal is from his First Book of Balletts to Five Voices (1595). A ballett was the English form of the Italian balletto, a light, homophonic and strophic song for three or more singers, distinguished by dance-like rhythms and fa la refrains. Morley was the composer who established the English madrigal proper, though many of his compositions are in re-workings of works by Italian composers. This one is based on Gastoldi's Questa dolce sirena (1591), and I thought it would be interesting to look at it as well.

Go back to index of previous meetings.

Saturday 3rd October 2020 (virtual only)

YouTube playlist of all pieces

Tallis Salvator mundi or YouTube SAATB
Thomas Tallis became a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal in 1543 and remained there until his death. His career reflects the religious upheaval and political change that affected church music of this period. Salvator mundi, a setting of the antiphon for Matins on the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross (14 September), is the first of his two settings of the text. It begins imitatively, with soprano and alto 2 in canon at the octave, but quickly moves into a freer and more expressive style, with insistent pitch repetition at 'auxiliare nobis', an affecting pathos of the descending 'te deprecamur', and dissonant intervals creating a sense of magnificence and piquancy.

Weelkes As Vesta was or YouTube Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATTB
Thomas Weelkes was a colourful personality: as the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography puts it, 'he was not the only disorderly member of the cathedral establishment, though in due course he would become its most celebrated'. Organist at Chichester Cathedral, he was in 1616 reported to the Bishop for being 'noted and famed for a comon drunckard (sic) and notorious swearer & blasphemer', and was dismissed for being drunk at the organ and using bad language during divine service. He was soon reinstated (although his behaviour did not improve!) and remained in the post until his death. Weelkes' madrigals have often been compared to Wilbye's and he was friends with Morley.

Iíve chosen this piece because of its glorious word-painting! Look out for 'hill', 'descending', 'ascending', 'running down', 'two by two', 'three by three', 'all alone', and 'Long (live fair Oriana)'. The musical architecture is ABCDCBA, based on contrasts of texture.

Morley In every place or YouTube SATB
From Madrigals to 4 voyces (1594). A short but exquisite piece on the pains of love. Slow and delicate, note especially its plangent suspensions on 'and grief doth so torment me' and a sweetly evocative 'O gentle love'. We loved this piece when we first looked at it in March 2019 and I've been wanting to sing it again ever since!

Farmer Fair Phyllis or YouTube Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SATB
Fair Phyllis dates from 1599 and is a polyphonic romp in Arcadian meadows, with a fair amount of ribaldry thrown in for good measure. It alternates between duple and triple time and contains some clever word-painting: solo sopranos on 'all alone', tutti on 'feeding her flock' and some wry elision on 'kissing up and down'. 'Hied' is an archaic way of saying 'hurried'.

Morley Come lovers, follow me or YouTube SSAT
I've chosen this superb piece to take 'advantage' of the remote nature of this month's meeting, as it is a piece we wouldn't normally sing (as it is for SSAT). The subject is the sleeping Cupid.

Morley My bonny lass she smileth or YouTube SATTB
and Gastoldi Questa dolce sirena or YouTube also this instrumental version is lovely! SSATB
Morley's madrigal is from his First Book of Balletts to Five Voices (1595). A ballett was the English form of the Italian balletto, a light, homophonic and strophic song for three or more singers, distinguished by dance-like rhythms and fa la refrains. Morley was the composer who established the English madrigal proper, though many of his compositions are in re-workings of works by Italian composers. This one is based on Gastoldi's Questa dolce sirena (1591), and I thought it would be interesting to look at it as well.

Go back to index of previous meetings.

Saturday 3rd October 2020 (virtual only)

YouTube playlist of all pieces

Tallis Salvator mundi or YouTube SAATB
Thomas Tallis became a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal in 1543 and remained there until his death. His career reflects the religious upheaval and political change that affected church music of this period. Salvator mundi, a setting of the antiphon for Matins on the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross (14 September), is the first of his two settings of the text. It begins imitatively, with soprano and alto 2 in canon at the octave, but quickly moves into a freer and more expressive style, with insistent pitch repetition at 'auxiliare nobis', an affecting pathos of the descending 'te deprecamur', and dissonant intervals creating a sense of magnificence and piquancy.

Weelkes As Vesta was or YouTube Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SSATTB
Thomas Weelkes was a colourful personality: as the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography puts it, 'he was not the only disorderly member of the cathedral establishment, though in due course he would become its most celebrated'. Organist at Chichester Cathedral, he was in 1616 reported to the Bishop for being 'noted and famed for a comon drunckard (sic) and notorious swearer & blasphemer', and was dismissed for being drunk at the organ and using bad language during divine service. He was soon reinstated (although his behaviour did not improve!) and remained in the post until his death. Weelkes' madrigals have often been compared to Wilbye's and he was friends with Morley.

Iíve chosen this piece because of its glorious word-painting! Look out for 'hill', 'descending', 'ascending', 'running down', 'two by two', 'three by three', 'all alone', and 'Long (live fair Oriana)'. The musical architecture is ABCDCBA, based on contrasts of texture.

Morley In every place or YouTube SATB
From Madrigals to 4 voyces (1594). A short but exquisite piece on the pains of love. Slow and delicate, note especially its plangent suspensions on 'and grief doth so torment me' and a sweetly evocative 'O gentle love'. We loved this piece when we first looked at it in March 2019 and I've been wanting to sing it again ever since!

Farmer Fair Phyllis or YouTube Also in the Oxford Book of English Madrigals SATB
Fair Phyllis dates from 1599 and is a polyphonic romp in Arcadian meadows, with a fair amount of ribaldry thrown in for good measure. It alternates between duple and triple time and contains some clever word-painting: solo sopranos on 'all alone', tutti on 'feeding her flock' and some wry elision on 'kissing up and down'. 'Hied' is an archaic way of saying 'hurried'.

Morley Come lovers, follow me or YouTube SSAT
I've chosen this superb piece to take 'advantage' of the remote nature of this month's meeting, as it is a piece we wouldn't normally sing (as it is for SSAT). The subject is the sleeping Cupid.

Morley My bonny lass she smileth or YouTube SATTB
and Gastoldi Questa dolce sirena or YouTube also this instrumental version is lovely! SSATB
Morley's madrigal is from his First Book of Balletts to Five Voices (1595). A ballett was the English form of the Italian balletto, a light, homophonic and strophic song for three or more singers, distinguished by dance-like rhythms and fa la refrains. Morley was the composer who established the English madrigal proper, though many of his compositions are in re-workings of works by Italian composers. This one is based on Gastoldi's Questa dolce sirena (1591), and I thought it would be interesting to look at it as well.